Subterannean

Exhibition of Nicolas Moulin
February 23rd - March 30th, 2013


Press

Since its early days, the work of Nicolas Moulin is dedicated to the exploration and representation of urban architectural utopias and dystopian landscapes that result from it. Through these trick photographs and images of hybrid landscapes, he questions the notion of reality and its perception, as well as the historical memory through the representation and the projections we create of our future. Indeed, there is no futuristic vision without first acknowledging the basis on which it is built. Therefore, in an ironic paradox, this futuristic notion becomes obsolete as soon as the vision takes form.

Moreover and paradoxically, technical progress linked to the massive computerization of our societies has generated an acceleration of History. By breaking up yesterday’s linearity and transforming it into something spherical hence global, space and time shifts now operate without any hierarchy anymore, in a total entropy. In uchronian times, the question of futurism as a form of archaism becomes obsolete, as well as in the brutalistic ideology. The non-realisation of XXth century megalomaniac projects assures them a permanence through time and gives them a spectral omnipresence. As Le Corbusier used to say, the notion of progress in brutalism is to ''keep on building as in Middle Ages, but bigger, thanks to concrete''. From Middle Ages to our times, Nicolas Moulin looks more deeply into concepts of obsolescence as he already did in the 2008 installation ''Goldbarrgorod'' and in his 2010 movie ''Interlichtenstagespentereinzuladendarandenken''.

For his new solo exhibition at Valentin gallery, Nicolas Moulin suggests, once again, to launch us into a technical and representative universe, through false archives of architectural drawings conceived in an hybridization logic and a technical regression. Through these ''true-false'' photographs, the artist takes us into a new phase of his work, getting closer and closer to a personal reflexion on brutalistic architecture and fallen utopias.